Having lived in Telluride off and on for the past five years, I've documented several mining ruins, which range from rusting coils in streams, to mining structures that are preserved by local museums and historic societies. The sheer quantity of remains makes it impossible to maintain each site. Therefore, some sites are prioritized and saved, while others collapse with time. In only a few years span, I saw drastic changes in some of the buildings and became fascinated by what might be considered a valuable piece of history or what might be left to rust and rot. I began to seek out hikes specifically to document this idea.  I set out to explore what an object would look like in five or twenty years. Using Photoshop, she began to experiment with degradation, speeding up the decomposition process. By selecting fragments of an image, the viewer focuses on the details rather than the object. My subjects varied from well-known mining buildings to long forgotten unidentifiable rusted machinery. In order to provide the photographs with a tactile feel that is present in the actual ruins, I experimented with different wood types: aspen, eastern red cedar, cherry, walnut, birch, poplar and birds-eye maple.       
       
     
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 Having lived in Telluride off and on for the past five years, I've documented several mining ruins, which range from rusting coils in streams, to mining structures that are preserved by local museums and historic societies. The sheer quantity of remains makes it impossible to maintain each site. Therefore, some sites are prioritized and saved, while others collapse with time. In only a few years span, I saw drastic changes in some of the buildings and became fascinated by what might be considered a valuable piece of history or what might be left to rust and rot. I began to seek out hikes specifically to document this idea.  I set out to explore what an object would look like in five or twenty years. Using Photoshop, she began to experiment with degradation, speeding up the decomposition process. By selecting fragments of an image, the viewer focuses on the details rather than the object. My subjects varied from well-known mining buildings to long forgotten unidentifiable rusted machinery. In order to provide the photographs with a tactile feel that is present in the actual ruins, I experimented with different wood types: aspen, eastern red cedar, cherry, walnut, birch, poplar and birds-eye maple.       
       
     

Having lived in Telluride off and on for the past five years, I've documented several mining ruins, which range from rusting coils in streams, to mining structures that are preserved by local museums and historic societies. The sheer quantity of remains makes it impossible to maintain each site. Therefore, some sites are prioritized and saved, while others collapse with time. In only a few years span, I saw drastic changes in some of the buildings and became fascinated by what might be considered a valuable piece of history or what might be left to rust and rot. I began to seek out hikes specifically to document this idea.

I set out to explore what an object would look like in five or twenty years. Using Photoshop, she began to experiment with degradation, speeding up the decomposition process. By selecting fragments of an image, the viewer focuses on the details rather than the object. My subjects varied from well-known mining buildings to long forgotten unidentifiable rusted machinery. In order to provide the photographs with a tactile feel that is present in the actual ruins, I experimented with different wood types: aspen, eastern red cedar, cherry, walnut, birch, poplar and birds-eye maple. 

 

 

IMG_9985.jpg
       
     
cart.jpg
       
     
IMG_0023.jpg
       
     
mineshaft.jpg
       
     
IMG_9999.jpg
       
     
IMG_9970.jpg
       
     
IMG_9955.jpg
       
     
IMG_9966.jpg